Oct
20


Is a Smaller Home Right for You?

Thursday, October 20, 2011

So, this question is posed. How much space does your family really need? This isn't a simple cut and dry question. Every family has different needs and dynamics.
Let's put things into perspective, though. Having a large, show-stopper home doesn't equate with family happiness. Many families in centuries past lived happily in one room cabins and small-scale homes.
There are social benefits to sharing tighter quarters. Some families feel that smaller homes forces more together time, which means more time for bonding and strengthening relationships.
Smaller homes mean reduced costs across the board. Let's examine these for a moment. Property taxes are based on the value of your land and home. While more prestigious neighborhoods and homes within city limits typically pay higher taxes, remember that a smaller home in that same prestigious neighborhood will pay a smaller dollar amount in taxes each year. Maintenance costs are also lower. It costs much less to replace a roof on a 1,000 square foot house than it does on a 6,000 square foot one!
The same goes for home insurance and, let's not forget, the actual purchase price of the home. Reduced size means reduced costs.
Studies over the past few years have shown a solid trend regarding home sizes. Buyers today want smaller homes with smaller price tags. During the boom era in the mid-2000's, homeownership was about McMansions and spacious sprawls. The recent recession and continued ailing recovery have made many families rethink their budgets and lifestyles. A 9.1 percent unemployment rate hasn't "helped."
Perhaps the most important item is reduced energy costs. Smaller homes take less energy (and money) to heat and cool. Plus, there are fewer rooms and that means fewer lights to be left on!
Today's standard home, according to recent statistics from the Census Bureau’s Survey of Construction, is 2,150 square feet. This is down considerably from the boom era seen just 5 or 6 short years ago.
These standard houses have 2.5 baths and 3 bedrooms. Can your children share a bedroom? You bet. It can teach responsibility, sharing, and how to get along with others. These are all great lessons to learn as a child.
These standard houses also feature a garage, central air, a fireplace, separate dining room, and three miscellaneous rooms. This doesn't sound like a one room shack! It's simply an adjustment from the McMansions that boasted media rooms, exercise rooms, 5+ bedrooms, and a bathroom for every member of the family.
Just 60 years ago, when many people's grandparents or parents were first entering the housing market, the average home was just 1,000 square feet. Quaint and charming, these houses made warm and loving homes.
If you're thinking of entering the housing market and are feeling trapped by shrinking budgets, just remember that smaller houses can be just as charming, functional, and full of love!
So, this question is posed. How much space does your family really need? This isn't a simple cut and dry question. Every family has different needs and dynamics.

Let's put things into perspective, though. Having a large, show-stopper home doesn't equate with family happiness. Many families in centuries past lived happily in one room cabins and small-scale homes.There are social benefits to sharing tighter quarters. Some families feel that smaller homes forces more together time, which means more time for bonding and strengthening relationships.

Smaller homes mean reduced costs across the board. Let's examine these for a moment. Property taxes are based on the value of your land and home. While more prestigious neighborhoods and homes within city limits typically pay higher taxes, remember that a smaller home in that same prestigious neighborhood will pay a smaller dollar amount in taxes each year. Maintenance costs are also lower. It costs much less to replace a roof on a 1,000 square foot house than it does on a 6,000 square foot one.

The same goes for home insurance and, let's not forget, the actual purchase price of the home. Reduced size means reduced costs.Studies over the past few years have shown a solid trend regarding home sizes. Buyers today want smaller homes with smaller price tags. During the boom era in the mid-2000's, homeownership was about McMansions and spacious sprawls. The recent recession and continued ailing recovery have made many families rethink their budgets and lifestyles. A 9.1 percent unemployment rate hasn't "helped."

Perhaps the most important item is reduced energy costs. Smaller homes take less energy (and money) to heat and cool. Plus, there are fewer rooms and that means fewer lights to be left on!Today's standard home, according to recent statistics from the Census Bureau’s Survey of Construction, is 2,150 square feet. This is down considerably from the boom era seen just 5 or 6 short years ago.

These standard houses have 2.5 baths and 3 bedrooms. Can your children share a bedroom? You bet. It can teach responsibility, sharing, and how to get along with others. These are all great lessons to learn as a child.These standard houses also feature a garage, central air, a fireplace, separate dining room, and three miscellaneous rooms. This doesn't sound like a one room shack! It's simply an adjustment from the McMansions that boasted media rooms, exercise rooms, 5+ bedrooms, and a bathroom for every member of the family.Just 60 years ago, when many people's grandparents or parents were first entering the housing market, the average home was just 1,000 square feet. Quaint and charming, these houses made warm and loving homes.

If you're thinking of entering the housing market and are feeling trapped by shrinking budgets, just remember that smaller houses can be just as charming, functional, and full of love!





Comments subject to review.
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Estella said
"That is a beautiful shot with very good lighting ." about Women Consider Owning a Home to be a Vital Component of the American Dream
on Sunday, May 12, 2013 @ 9:57 AM

Chris White - Team Leader said
"Unfortunately you are not alone. It's more than an outcry. The powers that be really need to come down harder on Bofa than they already are. Working on these short sale for over 2 years now I've uncovered down right fraud happening on the lenders parts. If they cared more about moving this country forward than protecting their own wallets then they would cut the red tape and approve these short sales in a timely manner. Our team made the wise decision to get BofA loans which were FHA or Freddie Mac backed, approved prior to listing on the market. Then we can list the home as "Price Approved" and close in 30 days. In this instance BofA does a full appraisal, rather than an incompetent "Broker Price Opinion" (nothing against agents but they have no idea how to make adjustments on comparable homes) and then the bank issues an "Approval To Participate" letter which dictates what price we can go on the market and take anything north of 88%. I really do hope your situation improves. " about Congressional Bill to Speed Up Short Sales
on Tuesday, August 30, 2011 @ 9:15 AM

Lisa Zeiner said
"We made an offer 4 months ago to BofA, and have heard nothing. It was a cash offer which is better than the zero money they are collecting now. And since the people don't care they are trashing the place, by the time BofA gets around to it our offer will be gone as the place is a mess!! Septic issues now, garbage being dumnped. All of this could have been avoided if BofA really wanted to correct their cash flow problem and sell these properties in a timely manner. They cry about cash but then do nothing intelligent to fix the problem" about Congressional Bill to Speed Up Short Sales
on Tuesday, August 30, 2011 @ 9:06 AM

Jones Ramirez said
"Thank you for the work you have done into this post, it helps clear up a few questions I had." about How do appraiser’s determine a homes value?
on Tuesday, April 19, 2011 @ 10:07 PM

HollyRobsonf said
"Hey - I am certainly happy to find this. great job!" about Bank of America to Offer Principal Reduction to Underwater Borrowers
on Wednesday, April 13, 2011 @ 6:45 PM